Australian Bushfires Continue Wreaking Havoc

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Over 14.7 million acres have been burned across six of Australia’s states, claiming the lives of an estimated 1 billion animals and 25 people.

Many citizens fled to the beach where they would dig trenches or sail off into the ocean to prevent them from being caught in the fire.  

The fires began in early September of 2019, and are shockingly still ongoing and more destructive than ever. 

The citizens of Australia are appalled by their government’s inability to control the fires and reduce the damage that they have already caused. Prime Minister, Scott Morrison, is facing ridicule for opposing the suggested tax on heat-trapping admissions, which could help control the fires.

Bill Hare, director of Climate Analytics said that “the thing that strikes everyone about the present situation is the federal government’s disengagement and lethargy, to put it politely.”

Australians have begun hanging posters of Scott Morrison dressed in tropical vacation wear stating “MISSING” and “Your country is on fire”. These posters are a reaction to the government’s lack of attention given to this issue and shed light on the fact that Morrison fled his country to take some time off in Hawaii last month. 

Additionally, two dozen people have been arrested in New South Wales since November on charges of arson and starting bushfires. Another 53 people are facing legal action for not complying with the state’s fire ban. These charges can lead up to 21 years in prison.

These fires have shaken the whole world, and many people are trying to help out. Stars like Nicole Kidman, Chris Hemsworth, and Kylie Jenner have donated millions to the cause. 

These fires are also being interpreted as a foreshadowing of the planet’s future. 

BBC News states, “This year, Australia twice set a new temperature record: an average maximum of 41.9C was recorded on 18 December. That comes on top of a long period of drought.”

University of Sydney professor Dickman says that because Australia often sees the effects of climate change before other parts of the world, these fires could be a preview of what’s to come. 

There are many ways to donate to the cause. Some of the reliable organizations that are taking donations are the Australian Red Cross, the Celeste Barber’s fundraiser, and the Salvation Army Disaster Appeal.